ألقبيادس

Alcibiades
Ἀλκιβιάδης   Alkibiádēs
Bust Alcibiades Musei Capitolini MC1160.jpg
Alcibiades
ولدح. 450 ق.م.
أثينا، اليونان
توفي404 ق.م.
فريگيا
الولاءAthens
(415–412 BC Sparta)
الرتبةgeneral (strategos)
المعارك/الحروبمعركة أبيدوس (410 ق.م.)
Battle of Cyzicus (410 ق.م.)
حصار بيزنطيوم (408 ق.م.)

ألقبياديس Alcibiades Cleiniou Scambonides (عاش ح. 450 - 404 ق.م.) قائد عسكري أثيني أدى دورًا مهمًا في الحرب البلوبونيزية التي اندلعت بين أثينا وإسبرطة بين عامي 431 و 404 ق.م.

كان ألكيبياديس حارسًا للقائد اليوناني بيركليس والتلميذ المفضل لسقراط الفيلسوف الإغريقي الشهير. ودخل عالم السياسة في عام 420 ق.م.، وسرعان ما اكتسب شعبية، بسبب سياسته الخارجية المتشددة.

أدت هذه السياسة إلى نشوب حرب بين أثينا وإسبرطة في عام 418 ق.م. انتهت بهزيمة الأولى. وأقنع فيما بعد الأثينيين بغزو صقلية في عام 415 ق.م.

وفي 11 مايو 415 ق.م. في أثينا، التي كانت آنذاك في خضم الاعداد للحملة الصقلية في الحرب الپلوپونيزية ضد اسبرطة، تجد العديد من رؤوس تماثيل الآلهة مقطوعة، وكانت موضوعة فوق أعمدة هرما، كما وجدوا تمثال الإله هرمز مشوهاً، وقد دارت الشكوك حول الجنرال ألقبيادس، الذي قام بتمثيل الطقوس الألويتية الخفية تمثيلاً هزليًا ساخرًا. إلا أن تحقيقاً لم يجري، لكي لا يؤخر انطلاق الحملة. وقبيل بداية الغزو اتهمه المواطنون


رفض الأثينيون طلبه بعقد محاكمة سريعة له لذلك ذهب إلى صقلية. لكنه استدعي إلى أثينا عقب وصوله إلى صقلية لكي تتم محاكمته، فهرب إلى إسبرطة. نصح الإسبرطيين بمساعدة الصقليين، مما أدى إلى هزيمة الأثينيين في صقلية.

بعد ذلك شك الإسبرطيون في ولائه. ولذا عمل ألكيبياديس مستشارًا للزعيم الفارسي تيسافرينز، وهزم الإسبرطيين في عدة معارك وأصبح بطلاً. ولكن في عام 406ق.م استطاع القائد الإسبرطي ليسندر هزيمته. وعقب الهزيمة النهائية هرب ألكيبياديس إلى آسيا الصغرى (تركيا حاليًا)، وهنالك أشعل أعداؤه النار في منزله، ومات أثناء محاولته الهرب.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

في آسيا الصغرى

جان-باتيست رينو (1754–1829): سقراط يجر ألقبيادس من عناق الملذات الحسية, 1791.


وفاته

ميشله ده ناپولي (1808–1892): Morte di Alcibiade (وفاة ألقبيادس) (ح. 1839)، متحف ناپولي الأثري الوطني.


تقييمه

شاهد قبر إپـّارتيا، ابنة ألقبيادس. مقبرة كراميكوس (أثينا).


الانجازات العسكرية

Pietro Testa (1611–1650): ألقبيادس المخمور يستوقف الندوة (1648).
فيلكس أوڤري (1830–1833): ألقبيادس مع حاشيته (1833)، متحف الفنون الجميلة في ڤالنسيان

بالرغم من تعليقاته الناقدة، فإن ثوكيديدس يعترف في استرسال قصير أنه "في العلن كان سلوكه في الحرب على أروع ما يمكن أن نصبو إليه".[1] أما ديودورس الصقلي ودموستينس فيعتبرانه قائداً عسكرياً عظيماً.[2][3]


مهارته في الخطابة

يؤكد پلوتارخ أن "ألقبيادس كان أقدر الخطباء بالاضافة لمواهبه الأخرى"، بينما يجادل ثيوفراسطس أن ألقبيادس كان الأقدر على اكتشاف وفهم المطلوب في أي قضية.


ملاحظات

^ a: Isocrates asserts that Alcibiades was never a pupil of Socrates.[4] Thus he does not agree with Plutarch's narration.[5] According to Isocrates, the purpose of this tradition was to accuse Socrates. The rhetorician makes Alcibiades wholly the pupil of Pericles.[6]
^ b: According to Plutarch, who is however criticized for using "implausible or unreliable stories" in order to construct Alcibiades' portrait,[7] Alcibiades once wished to see Pericles, but he was told that Pericles could not see him, because he was studying how to render his accounts to the Athenians. "Were it not better for him," said Alcibiades, "to study how not to render his accounts to the Athenians?".[5] Plutarch describes how Alcibiades "gave a box on the ear to Hipponicus, whose birth and wealth made him a person of great influence." This action received much disapproval, since it was "unprovoked by any passion of quarrel between them". To smooth the incident over, Alcibiades went to Hipponicus's house and, after stripping naked, "desired him to scourge and chastise him as he pleased". Hipponicus not only pardoned him but also bestowed upon him the hand of his daughter.[8] Another example of his flamboyant nature occurred during the Olympic games of 416 where "he entered seven teams in the chariot race, more than any private citizen had ever put forward, and three of them came in first, second, and fourth".[9] According to Andocides, once Alcibiades competed against a man named Taureas as choregos of a chorus of boys and "Alcibiades drove off Taureas with his fists. The spectators showed their sympathy with Taureas and their hatred of Alcibiades by applauding the one chorus and refusing to listen to the other at all."[10]
^ c: Plutarch and Plato agree that Alcibiades "served as a soldier in the campaign of Potidaea and had Socrates for his tentmate and comrade in action" and "when Alcibiades fell wounded, it was Socrates who stood over him and defended him".[5][11] Nonetheless, Antisthenes insists that Socrates saved Alcibiades at the Battle of Delium.[12]
^ d: Thucydides records several speeches which he attributes to Pericles; but Thucydides acknowledges that: "it was in all cases difficult to carry them word for word in one's memory, so my habit has been to make the speakers say what was in my opinion demanded of them by the various occasions, of course adhering as closely as possible to the general sense of what they really said."[13]
^ e: Kagan has suggested that Thrasybulus was one of the founding members of the scheme and was willing to support moderate oligarchy, but was alienated by the extreme actions taken by the plotters.[14] Robert J. Buck, on the other hand, maintains that Thrasybulus was probably never involved in the plot, possibly because he was absent from Samos at the time of its inception.[15]
^ f: In the case of the battle of Cyzicus, Robert J. Littman, professor at Brandeis University, points out the different accounts given by Xenophon and Diodorus. According to Xenophon, Alcibiades' victory was due to the luck of a rainstorm, while, according to Diodorus, it was due to a carefully conceived plan. Although most historians prefer the accounts of Xenophon,[16] Jean Hatzfeld remarks that Diodorus' accounts contain many interesting and unique details.[17]
^ g: Plutarch mentions Alcibiades' advice, writing that "he rode up on horseback and read the generals a lesson. He said their anchorage was a bad one; the place had no harbor and no city, but they had to get their supplies from Sestos".[18][19] B. Perrin regards Xenophon's testimony as impeachable[20] and prefers Diodorus' account.[21] According to A. Wolpert, "it would not have required a cynical reader to infer even from Xenophon's account that he (Alcibiades) was seeking to promote his own interests when he came forward to warn the generals about their tactical mistakes".[22]
^ h: According to Plutarch, some say that Alcibiades himself provoked his death, because he had seduced a girl belonging to a well-known family.[23] Thus there are two versions of the story: The assassins were probably either employed by the Spartans or by the brothers of the lady whom Alcibiades had seduced.[24] According to Isocrates, when the Thirty Tyrants established their rule, all Greece became unsafe for Alcibiades.[25]
^ i: Since the beginning of the war, the Athenians had already initiated two expeditions and sent a delegetion to Sicily.[26] Plutarch underscores that "on Sicily the Athenians had cast longing eyes even while Pericles was living".[27]


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

الهامش

  1. ^ خطأ استشهاد: وسم <ref> غير صحيح؛ لا نص تم توفيره للمراجع المسماة Th6.15
  2. ^ خطأ استشهاد: وسم <ref> غير صحيح؛ لا نص تم توفيره للمراجع المسماة Diodorus68
  3. ^ خطأ استشهاد: وسم <ref> غير صحيح؛ لا نص تم توفيره للمراجع المسماة Meidias144-145
  4. ^ Isocrates, Busiris, 5.
  5. ^ أ ب ت Plutarch, Alcibiades, 7.
  6. ^ Y. Lee Too, The Rhetoric of Identity in Isocrates, 216.
  7. ^ D. Gribble, Alcibiades and Athens, 30.
  8. ^ خطأ استشهاد: وسم <ref> غير صحيح؛ لا نص تم توفيره للمراجع المسماة Alcibiades8
  9. ^ Plutarch, Alcibiades, 12.
  10. ^ Andocides, ضد ألقبيادس, 20.
  11. ^ Plato, Symposium, 221a.
  12. ^ I. Sykoutris, ندوة أفلاطون (تعليقات), 225.
  13. ^ Thucydides, 1.22.
  14. ^ Donald Kagan, The Peloponnesian War, 385.
  15. ^ R.J. Buck, Thrasybulus and the Athenian Democracy, 27–8.
  16. ^ R.J. Littman, The Strategy of the Battle of Cyzicus, 271.
  17. ^ J. Hatzfeld, Alcibiade, 271
  18. ^ Plutarch, Alcibiades, 36.
  19. ^ Plutarch, Comparison with Coriolanus, 2
  20. ^ خطأ استشهاد: وسم <ref> غير صحيح؛ لا نص تم توفيره للمراجع المسماة Perrin25-37
  21. ^ خطأ استشهاد: وسم <ref> غير صحيح؛ لا نص تم توفيره للمراجع المسماة Diodorus105
  22. ^ A. Wolpert, Remembering Defeat, 5.
  23. ^ خطأ استشهاد: وسم <ref> غير صحيح؛ لا نص تم توفيره للمراجع المسماة Alcibiades39
  24. ^ H.T. Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities and W. Smith, New Classical Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography, 39.
  25. ^ Isocrates, Concerning the Team of Horses, 40.
  26. ^ A. Vlachos, Thucydides' Bias, 204.
  27. ^ خطأ استشهاد: وسم <ref> غير صحيح؛ لا نص تم توفيره للمراجع المسماة Alcibiades17

المراجع

المصادر الرئيسة


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

مصادر ثانوية

  • "Alcibiades". Encyclopaedia Britannica. 2005.
  • "Alcibiades". Encyclopaedia of Ancient Greece. Routledge (UK). 2002. ISBN 0-415-97334-1.
  • "Alcibiades". Encyclopaedic Dictionary The Helios. 1952. In Greek.
  • Andrewes, A. (1992). "The Spartan Resurgence". The Cambridge Ancient History edited by David M. Lewis, John Boardman, J. K. Davies, M. Ostwald (Volume V). Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-23347-X.
  • Buck, R.J. (1998). Thrasybulus and the Athenian Democracy: the Life of an Athenian Statesman. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag. ISBN 3-515-07221-7.
  • Buckley, Terry (1996). Aspects of Greek History 750–323 BC. Routledge (UK). ISBN 0-415-09957-9.
  • Cartwright David, Warner Rex (1997). A Historical Commentary on Thucydides: A Companion to Rex Warner's Penguin Translation. University of Michigan Press. ISBN 0-472-08419-4.
  • Cawkwell, George (1997). Thucydides and the Peloponnesian War. Routledge (UK). ISBN 0-415-16552-0.
  • Corrigan, Elena (2004). "Alcibiades and the Conclusion of the Symposium". Plato's Dialectic at Play. Penn State Press. ISBN 0-271-02462-3.
  • Cox, C.A. (1997). "What Was an Oikos?". Household Interests. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-01572-4.
  • Denyer, Nicolas (2001). Alcibiades (commentary). Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-63414-8.
  • Due, Bodil (1991). "The Return of Alcibiades in Xenophon's Hellenica". "Classica et Mediaevalia — Revue Danoise de Philologie et D'Histoire". Museum Tusculanum Press. XLII: 39–54. ISBN 0-521-38867-8. Retrieved 2006-09-23.
  • Ellis, Walter M. (1989). Alcibiades. Routledge. ISBN 0-415-00994-4.
  • Gomme, A. W. (1945–81). An Historical Commentary on Thucydides (I–V). Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-814198-X. Unknown parameter |coauthors= ignored (|author= suggested) (help)
  • Gribble, David (1999). Alcibiades and Athens: A Study in Literary Presentation. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-815267-1.
  • Habinek, Thomas N. (2004). Ancient Rhetoric and Oratory. Blackwell Publishing. ISBN 0-631-23515-9.
  • Hatzfeld, Jean (1951). Alcibiade (in French). Presses Universitaires de France.
  • Kagan, Donald (1991). The Fall of the Athenian Empire. Cornell University Press. ISBN 0-8014-9984-4.
  • Kagan, Donald (2003). The Peloponnesian War. Viking Penguin (Penguin Group). ISBN 0-670-03211-5.
  • Kahn, C. (1994). "Aeschines on Socratic Eros". In Paul A. Vander Waerdt (ed.). The Socratic Movement. Cornell University Press. ISBN 0-801-49903-8.
  • Kern, Paul Bentley (1999). "Treatment of Captured Cities". Ancient Siege Warfare. Indiana University Press. ISBN 0-253-33546-9.
  • Lee Too, Yun (1995). "The Politics of Discipleship". The Rhetoric of Identity in Isocrates. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-47406-X.
  • Littman, Robert J. (1968). "The Strategy of the Battle of Cyzicus". Transactions and Proceedings of the American Philological Association. 99: 265–72. doi:10.2307/2935846.
  • McCann David, Strauss Barry (2001). War and Democracy: A Comparative Study of the Korean War and the Peloponnesian War. M.E. Sharpe. ISBN 0-7656-0695-X.
  • McGregor, Malcolm F. (1965). "The Genius of Alkibiades". Phoenix. 19: 27–50. doi:10.2307/1086688.
  • Paparrigopoulos, Konstantinos (-Pavlos Karolidis) (1925), History of the Hellenic Nation (Volume Ab). Eleftheroudakis (in Greek).
  • Peck, Harry Thurston (1898). Harper's Dictionary Of Classical Literature And Antiquities.
  • Perrin, Bernadotte (1906). "The Death of Alcibiades". Transactions and Proceedings of the American Philological Association. 37: 25–37. doi:10.2307/282699.
  • Platias Athanasios G., Koliopoulos Constantinos (2006). Thucydides on Strategy. Eurasia Publications. ISBN 960-8187-16-8.
  • Press, Sharon (1991). "Was Alcibiades a Good General?". Brown Classical Journal. 7.
  • Price, Simon (1999). "Religious Places". Religions of the Ancient Greeks. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-38867-8.
  • Rhodes, P.J. (2005). A History of the Classical Greek World. Blackwell Publishing. ISBN 0-631-22564-1.
  • Sealey, Raphael (1976). "The Peloponnesian War". A History of the Greek City States, 700–338 BC. University of California Press. ISBN 0-520-03177-6.
  • Scott, Gary Alan (2000). "Socrates and Teaching". Plato's Socrates as Educator. SUNY Press. ISBN 0-7914-4723-5.
  • Smith, Willian (1851). A New Classical Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography, Mythology and Geography. Harper & brothers.
  • Strauss, Leo (1978). The City and Man. University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0-226-77701-4.
  • Sykoutris, Ioannis (1934). Symposium (Introduction and Comments). Estia. In Greek.
  • Vlachos, Angelos (1974). Thucydides' Bias. Estia (in Greek).
  • Wolpert, Andrew (2002). Remembering Defeat: Civil War and Civic Memory in Ancient Athens. Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 0-8018-6790-8.

للاستزادة

  • Atherton, Gertrude (2004). The Jealous Gods. Kessinger Publishing Co. ISBN 1-4179-2807-7.
  • Chavarria, Daniel (2005). The Eye Of Cybele. Akashic Books. ISBN 1-888451-67-X.
  • Green, Peter (1967). Achilles his Armour. Doubleday.
  • Hughes-Hallett, Lucy. Heroes: A History of Hero Worship. Alfred A. Knopf, New York, New York, 2004. ISBN 1-4000-4399-9.
  • Pressfield, Steven. Tides of War: A Novel of Alcibiades and the Peloponnesian War. Doubleday, New York, New York, 2000. ISBN 0-385-49252-9.
  • Robinson, Cyril Edward (1916). The Days of Alkibiades. E. Arnold.
  • Romilly de, Jacqueline (1997). Alcibiade, ou, Les Dangers de l'Ambition (in French). LGF. ISBN 2-253-14196-8.
  • Sutcliff, Rosemary (1971). Flowers of Adonis. Hodder & Stoughton Ltd. ISBN 0-340-15090-4.

وصلات خارجية

سير
نصوص وتحليلات